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141106-142012 TimAuer_Fox in Camouflage_PolarPassion.tif

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Churchill, Canada
Perfectly suited to its environment, an arctic fox on the prowl brushes by a blade of grass, spilling its load of snow to the ground...Look closely at the eyes of the Arctic Fox - one pupil is larger than the other....
If you're fortunate to see the fall/winter sun in the arctic, you know the low angle it follows will guarantee top quality light for photography at any hour it is shining. As November turns to December the sun barely blips the horizon, and this high-quality, but rapidly diminishing, light may make for interesting pictures, it also presents challenges to any wildlife that live there.

This is winter time in the arctic, and the animals here are ready to handle it. The most obvious winter adaptation of the arctic fox is the white fur. This fur is also the most dense fur of any land animal yet studied, providing excellent insulation. But if you look closely at the eyes of this white fox, you may notice two things. The first is that the pupils are slits, and the second is that shadowed eye is significantly more dilated than the bright eye. The moment before, this fox was looking towards the sun with both eyes, and the pupils were more or less equal in size.

The arctic fox is crepuscular, preferring twilight, so it must adeptly handle this transition from light to dark (or vice-versa). The slit pupils and acute sensitively to light are an adaptation for these conditions. And the arctic fox is particularly well suited for the almost perpetual twilight it experiences for so many months each year. Alternatively, in summer the slits may also protect the eye by restricting the amount of light that can enter during the long hours of daylight.

Canon EOS 1DX, Canon EF 600mm f/4 L IS II USM, Canon Extender EF1.4× III, handheld
1/500s; f/9; 840mm; ISO800
Copyright
Tim Auer | www.4b.io
Image Size
4960x3307 / 94.3MB
Contained in galleries
Featured, Fox, Fox Full
Churchill, Canada<br />
Perfectly suited to its environment, an arctic fox on the prowl brushes by a blade of grass, spilling its load of snow to the ground...Look closely at the eyes of the Arctic Fox - one pupil is larger than the other....<br />
If you're fortunate to see the fall/winter sun in the arctic, you know the low angle it follows will guarantee top quality light for photography at any hour it is shining. As November turns to December the sun barely blips the horizon, and this high-quality, but rapidly diminishing, light may make for interesting pictures, it also presents challenges to any wildlife that live there.<br />
<br />
This is winter time in the arctic, and the animals here are ready to handle it. The most obvious winter adaptation of the arctic fox is the white fur. This fur is also the most dense fur of any land animal yet studied, providing excellent insulation. But if you look closely at the eyes of this white fox, you may notice two things. The first is that the pupils are slits, and the second is that shadowed eye is significantly more dilated than the bright eye. The moment before, this fox was looking towards the sun with both eyes, and the pupils were more or less equal in size.<br />
<br />
The arctic fox is crepuscular, preferring twilight, so it must adeptly handle this transition from light to dark (or vice-versa). The slit pupils and acute sensitively to light are an adaptation for these conditions. And the arctic fox is particularly well suited for the almost perpetual twilight it experiences for so many months each year. Alternatively, in summer the slits may also protect the eye by restricting the amount of light that can enter during the long hours of daylight.<br />
<br />
Canon EOS 1DX, Canon EF 600mm f/4 L IS II USM, Canon Extender EF1.4× III, handheld<br />
1/500s; f/9; 840mm; ISO800