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Eye to Eye: American Marten
American Marten
Martes americana
Yellowstone National Park, USA
By Tim Auer
Mountain View, California, USA
www.4b.io
The story:
Look closely into this marten’s eyes. If you look carefully, you can see the reflection of the forest scene before it.

A curious and playful species, the american marten is not an easy animal to photograph. It is small and fast with an ability to vanish as quickly as it appeared, and certainly won’t wait for you to switch to your telephoto lens. If a wildlife photographer wishes to capture this species in its natural habitat, s/he needs to be prepared upon encounter..
As is typical of special wildlife photos, this photo is the result of preparation, and a bit of luck. While snowmobiling through Yellowstone, I stopped for a break near the Swan Lake Flat. Fortunately, I had an optimal set­up already on my camera, 600mm F/4 +1.4x Extender, giving 840mm focal length. I drove the snowmobile with this camera+lens on my lap all day, which, given the size of this kit, is no easy task to do while handling a snowmobile. But having this kit immediately available during the few brief seconds the marten was in sight, made this shot possible. The marten bounded with ease on top of the 4 ft/1.5m deep powder snow, and appeared to play peek­a­boo from behind trees, while I post­holed clumsily behind it, keeping the lens barrel above my head to keep snow out. It was not easy to get into shooting position with such deep snow, in fact it was exhausting. But as I crouched deep in the snow, at eye level with the marten while flakes of powder snow fell softly, I clicked this sharp result.

The American Marten is classified as a furbearer by most of the state wildlife agencies in its distribution, but fortunately, several of the states it calls home do not have a trapping season for it. Still its presence is an important indicator of the overall health of its forest ecosystem. It requires a rather large home range for a m
Copyright
Tim Auer | www.4b.io
Image Size
4279x2853 / 69.9MB
Contained in galleries
Yellowstone, Featured, Yellowstone Full
Eye to Eye: American Marten<br />
American Marten <br />
Martes americana<br />
Yellowstone National Park, USA<br />
By Tim Auer<br />
Mountain View, California, USA<br />
www.4b.io<br />
The story: <br />
Look closely into this marten’s eyes. If you look carefully, you can see the reflection of the forest scene before it.<br />
<br />
A curious and playful species, the american marten is not an easy animal to photograph. It is small and fast with an ability to vanish as quickly as it appeared, and certainly won’t wait for you to switch to your telephoto lens. If a wildlife photographer wishes to capture this species in its natural habitat, s/he needs to be prepared upon encounter..  <br />
As is typical of special wildlife photos, this photo is the result of preparation, and a bit of luck. While snowmobiling through Yellowstone, I stopped for a break near the Swan Lake Flat. Fortunately, I had an optimal set­up already on my camera, 600mm F/4 +1.4x Extender, giving 840mm focal length. I drove the snowmobile with this camera+lens on my lap all day, which, given the size of this kit, is no easy task to do while handling a snowmobile. But having this kit immediately available during the few brief seconds the marten was in sight, made this shot possible. The marten bounded with ease on top of the 4 ft/1.5m deep powder snow, and appeared to play peek­a­boo from behind trees, while I post­holed clumsily behind it, keeping the lens barrel above my head to keep snow out. It was not easy to get into shooting position with such deep snow, in fact it was exhausting.  But as I crouched deep in the snow, at eye level with the marten while flakes of powder snow fell softly, I clicked this sharp result. <br />
<br />
The American Marten is classified as a furbearer by most of the state wildlife agencies in its distribution, but fortunately, several of the states it calls home do not have a trapping season for it. Still its presence is an important indicator of the overall health of its forest ecosystem. It requires a rather large home range for a m