Image 1 of 1

140204-122411 TimAuer_Biscuit Basin Ghosts -35 Degrees_Landscape.tif

Add to Cart
As the world's first national park, a visit to Yellowstone in any season does not disappoint. Winter, however is different. It is in the winter, when the temperatures routinely drop lower than anywhere else in the USA’s lower 48 states, that the park's ecology and geology shine the brightest. Yellowstone is at its best when the park is at its coldest. Renowned for its abundant wildlife and extensive geothermal features (most extensive in the world), Yellowstone has at times been faulted for lacking the iconic vistas that define some of the other US national parks, such as Yosemite or Glacier. However, the ecological variety and ever-changing geothermal landscapes creates iconic scenes that may only last a moment. The trick is to be at the right spot, at the right moment to witness it. And it is because of the fleeting nature of these scenes that make the resulting image more profound; it serves as a reminder of the Earth's transient nature. On a geological scale, this is universally true everywhere, the earth's surface is in constant flux. But on a human scale we rarely have the opportunity to witness this geological ballet. These types of geological changes to the earth are most apparent here than anywhere else in the world.
It needs to be extremely cold for snow and ice to lay cover within a hot and steamy thermal area, and even colder for the delicate rime frost formations persist and grow. On the day this photo was taken, a low temperature of -56F/-50C was recorded within the park. It is under conditions like these that the rime frost on a tree turns can turn it into a ghost.
Canon EOS 6D, Canon EF 24-105mm f/4.0L IS USM, handheld
1/1000s, f/8; 24mm; ISO100
Post Processing done using Lightroom 5.7.1
Copyright
Tim Auer | www.4b.io
Image Size
5472x3648 / 114.3MB
Contained in galleries
Yellowstone, Yellowstone Full
As the world's first national park, a visit to Yellowstone in any season does not disappoint. Winter, however is different. It is in the winter, when the temperatures routinely drop lower than anywhere else in the USA’s lower 48 states, that the park's ecology and geology shine the brightest. Yellowstone is at its best when the park is at its coldest. Renowned for its abundant wildlife and extensive geothermal features (most extensive in the world), Yellowstone has at times been faulted for lacking the iconic vistas that define some of the other US national parks, such as Yosemite or Glacier.  However, the ecological variety and ever-changing geothermal landscapes creates iconic scenes that may only last a moment.  The trick is to be at the right spot, at the right moment to witness it. And it is because of the fleeting nature of these scenes that make the resulting image more profound; it serves as a reminder of the Earth's transient nature. On a geological scale, this is universally true everywhere, the earth's surface is in constant flux.  But on a human scale we rarely have the opportunity to witness this geological ballet. These types of geological changes to the earth are most apparent here than anywhere else in the world.  <br />
It needs to be extremely cold for snow and ice to lay cover within a hot and steamy thermal area, and even colder for the delicate rime frost formations persist and grow.  On the day this photo was taken, a low temperature of -56F/-50C was recorded within the park.  It is under conditions like these that the rime frost on a tree turns can turn it into a ghost.<br />
Canon EOS 6D, Canon EF 24-105mm f/4.0L IS USM, handheld<br />
1/1000s, f/8; 24mm; ISO100<br />
Post Processing done using Lightroom 5.7.1