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Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA
Sawmill Geyser Erupting at sunset with coyote prints away.
When staying at Old Faithful in winter, I always make sure to walk the geyser basin each day at sunrise and sunset. Generally planning my route based on estimated geyser eruptions and available light. On this evening, the basin was particularly cold and empty. I saw Sawmill erupting in irregular jets of steam and made my way towards it. It is especially challenging to photograph Yellowstone's Thermal features in winter because of all the steam they generate. And the colder the day, the more apparent the steam! My goal was to time the shots to maximize the explosiveness of the water column, when there was minimal steam to obscure the details in the column and spray. Adding to the challenge is that Sawmill shares plumbing with its neighboring geysers, which means there are multiple geysers simultaneously active, increasing the amount of steam. During each brief eruption pause in nearby Tardy and Spasmodic Geysers, I waited for Sawmill to eject an explosive jet skyward. The timing was key, and it resulted in this image. Note the coyote foot prints leading to and away from the snow circle.

As the world's first national park, a visit to Yellowstone in any season does not disappoint. Winter, however is different. It is in the winter, when the temperatures routinely drop lower than anywhere else in the USA’s lower 48 states, that the park's ecology and geology shine the brightest. Yellowstone is at its best when the park is at its coldest. Renowned for its abundant wildlife and extensive geothermal features (most extensive in the world), Yellowstone has at times been faulted for lacking the iconic vistas that define some of the other US national parks, such as Yosemite or Glacier. However, the ecological variety and ever-changing geothermal landscapes creates iconic scenes that may only last a moment. The trick is to be at the right spot, at the right momen
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Tim Auer | www.4b.io
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Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA<br />
Sawmill Geyser Erupting at sunset with coyote prints away. <br />
When staying at Old Faithful in winter, I always make sure to walk the geyser basin each day at sunrise and sunset. Generally planning my route based on estimated geyser eruptions and available light. On this evening, the basin was particularly cold and empty. I saw Sawmill erupting in irregular jets of steam and made my way towards it. It is especially challenging to photograph Yellowstone's Thermal features in winter because of all the steam they generate. And the colder the day, the more apparent the steam! My goal was to time the shots to maximize the explosiveness of the water column, when there was minimal steam to obscure the details in the column and spray. Adding to the challenge is that Sawmill shares plumbing with its neighboring geysers, which means there are multiple geysers simultaneously active, increasing the amount of steam. During each brief eruption pause in nearby Tardy and Spasmodic Geysers, I waited for Sawmill to eject an explosive jet skyward.  The timing was key, and it resulted in this image. Note the coyote foot prints leading to and away from the snow circle. <br />
<br />
As the world's first national park, a visit to Yellowstone in any season does not disappoint. Winter, however is different. It is in the winter, when the temperatures routinely drop lower than anywhere else in the USA’s lower 48 states, that the park's ecology and geology shine the brightest. Yellowstone is at its best when the park is at its coldest. Renowned for its abundant wildlife and extensive geothermal features (most extensive in the world), Yellowstone has at times been faulted for lacking the iconic vistas that define some of the other US national parks, such as Yosemite or Glacier.  However, the ecological variety and ever-changing geothermal landscapes creates iconic scenes that may only last a moment.  The trick is to be at the right spot, at the right momen